Archives for the month of: July, 2009
Making things disappear on the web has been on my mind since I was found by someone I didn’t really want to find me. This new program looks promising, but brings up the issue of what you want to eliminate and when. Blog posts? Email? Why not just think before you send?
clipped from www.newswise.com

This Article Will Self-destruct: A Tool to Make Online Personal Data Vanish

Newswise — Computers have made it virtually impossible to leave the past behind. College Facebook posts or pictures can resurface during a job interview. A lost cell phone can expose personal photos or text messages. A legal investigation can subpoena the entire contents of a home or work computer, uncovering incriminating, inconvenient or just embarrassing details from the past.

The University of Washington has developed a way to make such information expire. After a set time period, electronic communications such as e-mail, Facebook posts and chat messages would automatically self-destruct, becoming irretrievable from all Web sites, inboxes, outboxes, backup sites and home computers. Not even the sender could retrieve them.

  blog it
John Di Giglio has a great review of EverNotes, an online notetaking software.
clipped from ibraryguy.tumblr.com

Welcome EverNote!  A free tool designed to let you easily and quickly “capture information in any environment using whatever device or platform you find most convenient, and [which] makes this information accessible and searchable at any time, from anywhere”.  EverNote is accessible via smartphone (I have it on my iPhone), desktop (I have it on my Mac), and also via the web (click the link above).  It supports various devices and multiple platforms.  EverNote can be used to capture information / text, photos, audio, and even video. And did I mention that it is free?!?!?

  blog it
This post by Jennifer Farley tells WordPress users how to improve their font options.
clipped from www.sitepoint.com

Use Whatever Font You Please On WordPress

Type in WordPressEarlier in the year, Alex wrote an article about Cufon, a method of text replacement which uses JavaScript to replace HTML text with canvas elements that render the text in vector format. Basically if you’re a designer who is fed up or confused about the inability to put whatever type you darn well please on your web site, Cufon can help. For a more thorough overview on how text replacement works, read Alex’s article.

  blog it